CANCER CAUSING ENRGY EFFICIENT GLOBES

CANCER CAUSING ENERGY EFFICIENT GLOBES

We’re constantly being told that compact energy efficient fluorescent light bulbs (CFL) are better for the environment than older incandescent globes, but what you may not know is that the  CFL bulbs may actually be a lot more dangerous to life

SERIES OF OLDER GLOBES OVER THE YEARS

SERIES OF OLDER GLOBES OVER THE YEARS

Governments in their wisdom said incandescent globes will be phased out in November 2009 because they burn on average 80 per cent more energy than the newer bulbs.Poisonous bulbs must be good for us..!!

As the deadly poison fluoride in our drinking water is good for our teeth…!!!

Where do these governments get off.

If we want to be poisoned we can do it ourselves by choice.

DEADLY ODDS

DEADLY ODDS

Critics claim the CFL light bulbs give off dangerous amounts of radiation and can cause skin disorders and medical conditions – a claim that is strongly denied by both industry and medical officials.

“You would have to suffer from a skin condition such as Lupus and sit under a light bulb for an hour to develop any kind of adverse affect,” Dr Stephen Schmack [Dermatologyst] said.

Another health concern that has some people worried is the concentration of mercury contained in the CFL light bulbs.

CFL’s contain small amounts of mercury as vapour inside the glass tubing and average about 4.0 mg per bulb.

DANGER TO HEALTH

DANGER TO HEALTH

When the bulbs are broken or smashed open, a white vapour mist can come out and potentially cause dangerous levels of mercury in the surrounding environment.

Crime writer Clinton Smith is convinced the UV radiation from the new ‘green’ globes helped contribute to his head cancer.

“The dangers are not only great, they’re going to be unavoidable,” he said

“I’m going to put an incandescent globe on my desk – I don’t want to be irradiated all my working life.”

Clinton is even going as far as not purchasing the CFL light bulbs and stockpiling the older incandescent bulbs.

“I’m going to have a lot of them and my shed will be filled,” Clinton said.

“I’m very concerned about skin cancer with the CFL bulbs and I know that the incandescent globewill be safer

Is he right???

WHY-TELL ME WHY...

WHY-TELL ME WHY...

Although serious health problems resulting from one broken light bulb is rare, the federal government recommends that you wear gloves, protective clothing and sweep up the broken globes to prevent toxic dust from spreading through the home.

For more information please visit the Department of the Environment website

If you are worried about mercury poisoning, here’s what to look for.

There can be a number of problems associated with mercury poisoning including cramping, weak breathing, headaches, swelling and redness of the skin and death

Common neurological symptoms in children include decreased eye contact, poor concentration and loss of speech.

If you start to experience any of these symptoms, visit your doctor or call the Poison Hotline at 13 11 26

HOME DANGER FOR MANKIND

HOME DANGER FOR MANKIND

or DIE at the hands of  the political system which  wants to police us for our own good they say and give us no choice in our lighting or water purity options.

Posted by Henry Sapiecha 19th Jan 2009

Article by current affair

Iran continues to get high-tech equipment

Iran dupes US sanctions

Iran dupes US sanctions

WASHINGTON (UPI) — Iran has been able to evade U.S. attempts to bar imports of sophisticated technology through front companies and use of the Internet, The Washington Post said.

A report by the Institute for Science and Security and Justice Department says Iran has acquired Global Positioning devices along with circuit boards and software for improvised explosive devices in the past two years. They are on the list of items banned from export to Iran.

The Bush administration approved sanctions against Iranian front companies in Dubai in 2006. But officials say that after a brief disruption in the flow of high-tech equipment, Iran found other routes.

U.S. companies are unwittingly supplying Iran, not realizing that the apparent buyers are fronts.

“The schemes are so elaborate, even the most scrupulous companies can be deceived,” said David Albright, ISIS president and one of the authors of the study.

Article by United Press International

Published by Henry Sapiecha   Jan – 2009

First asteroids found with Earthlike crust

What is here from space?

What is here from space?

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (UPI) — Two meteorites found in Antarctica are from an asteroid with an outer layer or crust similar to the Earth’s continents, U.S. scientists said Thursday.

The finding is the first from an asteroid with an Earthlike crust, the University of Maryland geochemists and other researchers reported in the  Nature Journal.

They said the rocks are more than 4.52 billion years old and were formed during the birth of the solar system.

Antarctica Holds key to alien life form.

Antarctica Holds key to alien life form.

Their age, combined with the oxygen isotope data, “points to their origin from an asteroid rather than a planet,” Day said.

Asteroids, sometimes called minor planets or planetoids, are bodies, primarily of the inner solar system, that are smaller than planets but larger than meteoroids, but exclude comets.

Article  by United Press International

Published by Henry Sapiecha

Widespread use of illegal organs alleged

BODY PARTS FOR SALE

BODY PARTS FOR SALE

BERKELEY, Calif. (UPI) — Reputable U.S. medical centres transplant kidneys and other human organs they get illegally through the black market, a university anthropologist stated

Surgeons take black-market kidneys from people in the world’s most impoverished slums and put them into wealthy dialysis patients from the United States, Europe and Israel, Nancy Scheper-Hughes of the University of California at Berkeley told Newsweek.

She did not identify any hospitals, but Newsweek said she cited “a big Philadelphia hospital” as “a good place to go for brokered transplants.”

Scheper-Hughes — who spent more than a decade tracking the illegal sale of human organs across the globe — also said patients told her they got transplants “at top hospitals, with top surgeons” in New York and Los Angeles.

The organ trafficking is negotiated by an elaborate network of criminals, Scheper-Hughes said.

For about US$150,000, an organ broker connects a buyer and seller to a “broker-friendly” U.S. hospital, where surgeons are either complicit in the scheme or willing to turn a blind eye, she told Newsweek.

The organ seller typically gets a few thousand dollars, plus a chance to see a U.S. city, she said.

Buying and selling human organs is illegal in every country except Iran,

EYE FOR MONEY or MONEY FOR AN EYE

EYE FOR MONEY or MONEY FOR AN EYE

Yet organ trafficking — mostly of kidneys, but also of liver-sections, eyes, skin and blood — is flourishing.

The U.N. World Health Organization estimates 14,000 of the 70,000 kidneys transplanted around the world each year come from the black market.

Published by Henry Sapiecha

1…Barbie Doll

Barbie Doll

Barbie Doll

A number of toy buyers wouldn’t touch the barbie doll when she made her debut in 1959.

Reason-she was too adult. The creator of the barbie doll Ruth Handler said that stores would not order the doll because they felt the consumers would not buy a doll with breasts.

The rest is history.

2…Correction Fluid

whiteout markers-correction fluid

whiteout markers-correction fluid

The brainchild of its creation was Bette Nesmith Graham. Mother of former Monkee band member Michael NesmithThis correction fluid was first offered to IBM in 1956 under the marketing name of ‘Mistake Out’ but they rejected it out of hand.

After that, the product was renamed  ‘Liquid Paper’ and a cottage industry was established.

The kitchen was used as the laboratory and the garage as the bottling plant area.

By the end of 1957 she was selling over 100 bottles of this product ‘Liquid Paper ‘per month

Again the rest is history.

3…Fold-up Bicycle

Fold up push bike

Fold up push bike

Alex Moulton of Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire England designed the revolutionary pushbike that folds in 1958. It was offered to Raleigh the following year.It was promptly rejected by them.They felt the buying public would not take kindly to such a radical new invention. Moulton moved ahead anyway himself with his product and in 1965 sales had reached 70,000.Two years later in 1967 Raleigh had admitted their error in judgement and paid out Moulton fot the rights for the product.

4…Hovercraft

Land - sea- air-Hovercraft

Land - sea- air-Hovercraft

Christopher Cockerell by the late 1950’s had perfected his idea of the hovercraft and attempted to promote and sell his concept to industry. Aircraft companies however showed very little interest in his ideas as it was not an aircraft. Shipping companies rejected it also as it was not a boat.

It resided in no mans land for about a year until in 1958 Cokerell finally obtained the financial support & backing of a government dept ‘National Research & Development Corporation’.

The hovercraft  consequently went on to bigger and better things

5…Monolopy

Monopoly board game

Monopoly board game

Conceived by an unemployed heating engineer in Philadelphia USA Clarence B. Darrow, monopoly was turned down flat by games manufactureres Parker Brothers as having too many fundamental playing errors-52 to be precise.

Undaunted  Darrow proceeded with faith in his product to have 5,000 copies made by a local box manufacturer and met with such success that in 1935 Parker Brothers reveiwed their position and did a deal with Darrow to commence production after all.

6…Photocopier

Desk top Photo Copier

Desk top Photo Copier

Oklahoma office worker George C. Beidler thought up the world’s first phto copier back in 1903, but because it was painfully slow it attracted very little attention. In 1938 however an American patent attorney Chester Carison improved upon the invention but was hard pressed to find a research institute interested in taking the product further.

It was not until 57 years later that the Beidler dream of the office photo copier came off the production line – and the Xerox 914 came onto the market

7…Safety Razor

Gillette safety razor plan

Gillette safety razor plan

King Camp Gillette who invented the safety razor had  his share of teething problems in the initial stages of development. It went on sale in 1903 but in that first year was snubbed by the American buying public. Just 51 razors were sold the first year throughout the United States.

The following year, Gillette sold 90,000.

And so we have it-the rest is history

8…Trivial Pursuit

Trivial pursuit board game representation

Trivial pursuit board game representation

Three Canadians formulated the concept in 45 minutes but took 4 years to market the product.

These three young men, Chris Haney-a newspaper photographer, Scott Abbott-a sports writer, John Haney-an ex ice hockey player, lost $45,000 on their first batch of games they had manufactured. The designer of the game, unemployed artist Michael Wurstlin was devestated. He had exchanged his work for 5 shares in the company.

By 1986 the shares were worth $500,000 each

9…Tupperware

Tupperware clear plastic container

Tupperware clear plastic container

When Earl Silas Tupper first released his new product onto the market in 1945 he boasted the products ability to be sealed air tight and water tight. The seal almost proved to be his downfall as retail stores were unable to operate it. Tupperware was a product that initially was hidden from view from the buying public on the top shelf in stores.

Now let’s have a party.

10. Vacuum Cleaner

Every household has a vacuum cleaner

The Vacuum Cleaner Company was created in 1902 by Hubert Cecil Booth. Rather than sell his invention he began to offer the service to customers in having vacuuming done for them in their homes. The horse drawn vacuum device was huge and cumbersome and rowdy to boot. It was parked outside and long hoses were then brought into the premises to suck out the dust via the windows and doors. It was regarded by many as a nuisance as it frightened the passing horses which were used as transport of the day. Booth was sued by cab proprietors because of the negative influence the products use had on the horse drawn carriages they used.

Posted by Henry Sapiecha

Sourced from various sources

1…..Fish Fingers.

What's cooking good looking?

What's cooking good looking?

Birds Eye had planned to launch frozen herring to capitalize on the plentiful supplies of cheap British herring. This new product went on sale in South Wales.As very much a second choice they simultaeously launched another product in Southampton called cod sticks.These proved to be immensely popular such that the herring concept was discarded as the focal product and cod fish fingers was launched as a major product in 1955 at the expense of the herring

2…..Ice-Cream Cone.

Everybody's Favourite-Ice Cream

Everybody's Favourite

In 1904 at the St.Louis World’s fair a young ice cream salesman presented his girlfriend with an ice cream sandwich and a bunch of flowers. Since she had no vase for the flowers, the resourceful lady had rolled the layers of wrapping into the shape of a cone to use as a vase. The idea promoted the use of an edible cone for the containment of ice-cream

3…..Liquorice Allsorts.

Liquorice Allsorts

Selling liquorice sweets individually, one colour and or taste at a time, travelling salesman Charlie Thompson met with little enthusiasm from wholesalers until, one day at Leicester England in 1899 he accidently dropped the different individual sweets and got them all mixed up. When confronted with this assortment the wholesaler began to show interest in the products . The’ Liquorice Allsorts’ was born.

4…..Microwave Oven.

cook with waves

Cooking with waves

Percy Spencer a physicist and engineer on American radar equipoment manufacturers Raytheon, was employed during the second world war to make the magnetrons used in radar systems. He noticed that the magnetrons gave off as much heat as a large lightbulb and used them to warm his hands on cold days. But it wasn’t until he discovered a melted sweet in his pocket that the possibility  occurred of cooking with microwaves. How big was this micrtowave??

5…..Non-Stick Saucepan.

Assorted pots-n-pans

Assorted pots-n-pans

In 1938 Roy Plunkett of the American Company Du-Pont was working on refrigerants when he stumbled upon a polymer called polytetrafluoroethylene.or Teflon for short. Du-Pont began producing Teflon ten years later but it needed another folly encounter for it to be considered for kitchenware. In 1954 a french manufacturer Marc Gregoire chanced upon a process which would enable teflon coatings to be applied to metals. It occurred to him that the non-stick properties would be ideal for the kitchen environment and uitensils. He consequently founded the Tefal Company to make frying pans and saucepans

6…..Nylon.

lucky legs

Lucky legs

Three years into his studies in polymerisation Dr. Wallace Carothers, a research chemist with Du-Pont, discovered that a fibre of extreme tensile strength could be drawn form a mass of polymers. His task wasn’t even to create a specific product but the fibre, known as nylon was launched in 1938 by which time Carothers had committed suicide as he was a depressive during his life and did not see his crowning glory being acknowledged worldwide.

Industry will always be grateful to him.

We all can visualize many of the products made from this substance, one of which is the stocking.

7…..Paper Tissue.

kleenex,a fragrant soft treatment

Kleenex,a fragrant soft treatment

In 1924 Kimberly Clark brought out celluwipes, upmarket makeup removers made from paper pulp. Sales however were slow and special notice was given to letters from consumers about the celluwipe products. To managements’ surprise these letters highlighted the alternate perfect use of these products for blowing noses.

These products were then relaunched as the ‘Kleenex’ that we all know today

Yes, and they can be like a fragrant soft towell treatment with plain or textured and printed versions

8…..Post-it Note.

Tagged notepad

Tagged notepad

Spencer Silver, a research chemist with the American 3M Corporationwas told to create the strongest glue in the world. Instaed he cam up with the opposite, a temporary glue that would not hold anything for long.It’s only virtue was that it would leave no residue on the material to which it was applied when removed and could be reused over again. Silver’s glue remained idle for another 10 years until in 1980 a collegue, Arthur Fry, who sang in a church choir, noted that a litle of the glue on a strip of paper used as a bookmark in the hymnbook did not fall from the pages nor soiled the paper to which it was attached.

3M launched and marketed the product the following year.

We are all now very familiar with the product and the various colours in which it comes

9…..Superglue.

superglue experiments

superglue experiments

While studying uses and properties of ethyl cyanoacrylate in the 1950’s scientists with the Eastman Kodak Company accidently stuck together the glass prisims of a refractometer. This alerted them to the extreme bonding properties of this substance and superglue was born and is now well known to us all

Yes and now there is a superglue remover as well.

10…TCP.

can this cure venerial disease?

Can this cure venerial disease?

Count Callaimachi, a Romanian biochemist working in London, invented what he hoped was a cure for veneral disease. He named the liquid TCP because he thought it contained trichlorophenol, but it proved to be ineffective against veneral disease but was soon to be heralded for its strong antibacterial properties and was consequently marketed for use against infections of the throat and cuts and bruises

Researched from various sources by Henry Sapiecha

A new waste water treatment technology which is fuelled by the waste water it treats, has won the university of Queensland’s annual Enterprise competition in Australia.

New water treatment technology

New water treatment technology

Team Bilexys won the $100,000 prize for the technology which uses biochemical systems [BESs] to remove dissolved organics from wastewater.
Dr.Paul Batrrett says the technology has been in development at the Queensland University Advanced Wastewater Management Centre for three years and has grown from a 50ml laboratory experiment into a 1,000 litre fully functional pilot plant which has now been working for over a year at the Fosters brewery plant at Yatala in Brisbane.Qld. Australia

Other possible uses could be in biodiesel, organic chemicals, petrochemicals, brewing and beverages, distilling as well as the sugar and paper industries.

This system has a retrofit capability with other existing waste water treatment plants and modules can be added as and when required.

The technolgy has a number of distinct operational and cost benefits over present technologies used for treating waste water. The waste water can be treated as fuel and captures the energy from this fuel to use as part of the treatment therefore making it a far more efficient and cost effective process..

The prize money is to be used to find a chief executive to drive the technology further

ANY TAKERS?? Contact the University of Queensland

Sourced by Henry Sapiecha / Queensland Business Review Weekly Nov 2008

In a mammoth team effort and 14 hours of non stop surgery, a Brisbane man [Queensland Australia] had all his fingers re attached by a skilled team of surgeons at the Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane following an industrial accident.

reattached all fingers to hand

Orthapaedic surgeon, Dr Mark Robinson, part of the team of 6 surgeons who re-created the man’s hands, said the successful outcome was a tribute to team work.

Without that massive team effort and specialist staff involvement such a triump could never have been achieved.

This man has now the opportunity to live his life with some measure of independence.

Serious injuries such as these one has to do what one can with what one has got.

How so quickly a life can change and yet change again for the better.

Congratulations on a job well done…

Sourced by Henry Sapiecha from a

Qld Health Publication