VIDEO: A Day Made of Glass…Made Possible by Corning


For 160 years Corning Incorporated has been synonymous with glass. From the formulation of the first glass envelop (think light bulb) for Thomas Edison, to the invention and commercialization of optical fiber which revolutionized global communications networks, to LCD panels enabling a transformation in television viewing, to today’s Corning Gorilla Glass lending a protective cover to smartphones, tablet computers and flat screen televisions, Corning has been the world’s innovation leader in glass technology.
Source: ecnmag.com
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Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha


New lacquer-based antibacterial

active film keeps food fresher for longer

By Ben Coxworth

18:36 October 7, 2010

Fraunhofer's antibacterial food packaging film kills bacteria on food by releasing sorbic ...

Fraunhofer’s antibacterial food packaging film kills bacteria on food by releasing sorbic acid

Researchers from Germany’s Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging have developed a new type of food packaging film that kills food-inhabiting bacteria. While antimicrobial polymers in food packaging have been around for some time, the new material is unique in that it incorporates sorbic acid that has been dissolved into a lacquer, which is then deposited onto the film. When that lacquer first touches the food, a timed release of the acid begins, which neutralizes a significant number of the microorganisms on the food’s surface. The result, according to the researchers, is the ability to keep meat, fish and cheese fresher for longer.

Fraunhofer food chemist Carolin Hauser chose sorbic acid not just because it kills germs, but also because it’s non-toxic, non-allergenic, water-soluble, and doesn’t have a strong smell or taste. It is already used as a preservative in many foods, and is considered environmentally-safe, as it breaks down rapidly in soil.

Hauser used fresh pieces of pork loin for her evaluation of the film. She contaminated each of them with 1,000 colony-forming units of the E. coli bacteria, then wrapped some of them in regular film and some in her product. Differences in color between the two groups were apparent after several days in an 8C (46F) fridge. When she did a microbial analysis, she discovered that the E. coli population on the pork wrapped in her film had decreased to about one quarter its original size.

“After a week or so, the total germ count on the surface had decreased significantly compared to the meat packed in untreated film,” she said. “This indicates that our active film is suitable for maintaining the freshness – and above all the safety – of meat preparations, cheeses, fish fillets and other cold cuts.”

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

The Best of Plastic & Rubber in One Material

Polyurethane tubing resists oils, petroleum-based chemicals, radiation, moisture and fungi. It’s naturally flexible—no leachable plasticizers. Offers abrasion resistance and high tensile strength. Transparent, braid reinforced, or colors. Stocked in sizes up to 2″ I.D. Made in USA.

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Smart Tape Like Gecko Feet

Posted on January 30, 2008 by dikidee

gecko feet

Inspired by the gecko feet, University of California, Berkeley have created a new kind of tape.

Conventional adhesive tape sticks when pressed on a surface. A new gecko-inspired synthetic adhesive (GSA) does not stick when it is pressed into a surface, but instead sticks when it slides on the surface. A similar directional adhesion effect allows real geckos to run up walls while rapidly attaching and detaching toes. The gecko-inspired adhesive uses hard plastic microfibers. The plastic is not itself sticky, but the millions of microscopic contacts work together to adhere. The number of contacts automatically increases to handle higher loads. A feature of the hard plastic gecko-inspired adhesive is that no residue is left on surfaces as is left by conventional adhesive tapes.

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Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

Plastic Antibody Works in First Tests

in Living Animals

Science (June 11, 2010) — Scientists are reporting the first evidence that a plastic antibody — an artificial version of the proteins produced by the body’s immune system to recognize and fight infections and foreign substances — works in the bloodstream of a living animal.


The discovery, they suggest in a report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, is an advance toward medical use of simple plastic particles custom tailored to fight an array of troublesome “antigens.”

Those antigens include everything from disease-causing viruses and bacteria to the troublesome proteins that cause allergic reactions to plant pollen, house dust, certain foods, poison ivy, bee stings and other substances.

In the report, Kenneth Shea, Yu Hosino, and colleagues refer to previous research in which they developed a method for making plastic nanoparticles, barely 1/50,000th the width of a human hair, that mimic natural antibodies in their ability to latch onto an antigen. That antigen was melittin, the main toxin in bee venom. They make the antibody with molecular imprinting, a process similar to leaving a footprint in wet concrete. The scientists mixed melittin with small molecules called monomers, and then started a chemical reaction that links those building blocks into long chains, and makes them solidify. When the plastic dots hardened, the researchers leached the poison out. That left the nanoparticles with tiny toxin-shaped craters.

Their new research, together with Naoto Oku’s group of the University Shizuoka Japan, established that the plastic melittin antibodies worked like natural antibodies. The scientists gave lab mice lethal injections of melittin, which breaks open and kills cells. Animals that then immediately received an injection of the melittin-targeting plastic antibody showed a significantly higher survival rate than those that did not receive the nanoparticles. Such nanoparticles could be fabricated for a variety of targets, Shea says. “This opens the door to serious consideration for these nanoparticles in all applications where antibodies are used,” he adds.

Sourced and published by Henry Sapiecha 12th June 2010

SEX IN THE OCEAN IS GREAT FOR THESE OYSTERS

NEWLY INVENTED OYSTER BEDS ON WHICH OYSTERS GROW

BRING A NEW MEANING TO THE TERM ‘SEA BED’


Hi, this is Rex Ellis.

I am thrilled because my Harvest Post has now reached production stage! I have been developing this idea since 2006 and have had  great feed back and a lot of encouragement by the industry.
Have a look at the post with the baskets in the pic  and see for yourself. Today we have been out to sea and have sank the post within seconds into the sea bed. It was indeed very difficult to remove it again. The harvest post is very strong and can carry multiple baskets with single compartments in order to grow shellfish stress free and in a shorter time than so far possible thanks to 48 single compartments per basket.

I am ready to take your orders, please contact me for a quote on a custom made solution for your needs.

THE PRODUCT IS GUARANTEED TO HAVE A LIFE OF AT LEAST 25YEARS

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

HARVEST POST INVENTOR

[OYSTER GROWING]

Rex Ellis

About Me

I have worked in the plastic industry for over 20 years. We developed different products like tanks and a plastic picket fence with an inbuilt watering system. The idea about the revolutionising way of growing shellfish came to me when I saw how labour intensive and physically demanding the growing of shellfish is. Because I love eating oysters, scallops and mussels myself I want to see the highest quality of shellfish grown especially in New Zealand, my home country and Australia, my chosen place to live

0407 820 030
rexellisharvestpost@gmail.com

Sourced and published by Henry Sapiecha 4th May 2010

Cars of the Future:

Plastic Makes Perfect?

Automotive Engineers

Bend New Materials

into Futuristic Shapes

February 1, 2006 — New materials for car bodies may soon transform the auto industry. Auto engineers can mold these carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics into virtually any shape. The materials are both strong and light — increasing fuel efficiency and safety at the same time.


TROY, Mich.– Cars built entirely out of plastic could be the wave of the future, making metal a thing of the past when it comes to cars.

New, innovative cars made almost entirely of plastic are paving the way for what you may be driving in the future. Guan Chew,amechanical engineer at Porsche Engineering Services in Troy, Mich., says, “With plastics you can design cars which are very bold, and that gives you an advantage to sell nicer cars.”

Plastics have gained a lot of ground over traditional metals used in cars, making it possible to build almost an entire vehicle completely of non-metal material. Paul Ritchie, CEO and engineer at Porsche Engineering Services, says: “The Carrera GT is what we would refer to as a proving ground for one of our new materials. It’s made essentially from reinforced plastic.”

Mechanical engineers use a lightweight, high-strength aerospace material called carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic. It’s used in the doors, hoods, fenders, chasis and also in support frames for the engine and transmission.

“You can mold the plastics into very complicated shapes that maybe you can’t do in steel,” Chew says. Looks aren’t the only perks of plastic; plastics help cars lose weight to go farther on fuel.

New materials, like plastic, are usually tested on high-end vehicles first. Once the materials are proven to be more efficient and cost effective, they eventually filter down to affordable consumer vehicles.

BACKGROUND: Student designers at the College for Creative Studies are creating new plastic polymer materials as alternatives for automobile elements typically made of steel. The designs were part of a semester-long project sponsored by the American Plastics Council and the automotive division of the Society of Plastics Engineers.

ADVANTAGES: Among other advantages, plastics can significantly reduce the weight of a vehicle, improving fuel efficiency by reducing drag, and also cutting down on emissions. Because plastic can be more easily molded, components can be tailored for more comfortable human-ergonomic features, as well as more streamlined, aerodynamic shapes. Less material can be used than with steel components, and the durability of plastics results in a longer, more reliable vehicle lifetime.

ABOUT PLASTICS: Plastics are a type of polymer, a chemical substance made up of many very large, chain-shaped molecules. These molecules in turn form thousands of repeating units, much like the links in a chain. Different plastics are made by linking together different monomers into different length chains. Mixing polymers with various additives gives them many useful properties, which is why plastics are used so often in our everyday lives. Thermoplastics soften with heat and harden when cooled, such as polyvinylchloride (PVC) and Teflon. They are used in food packaging, milk and water bottles, electrical insulation, carpet fibers, and credit cards, among other applications. Thermosetting plastics harden with heat, such as epoxy and polyester. They can be found in mattresses, cushions, varnishes, glues, and coatings on electrical circuits.

MAKE YOUR OWN PLASTIC! Most plastics derive from oil (petroleum) but you can create the same kind of linked molecules with milk. (1) Pour 1/2 cup milk or heavy cream into a saucepan and heat to simmering over low to medium heat. (2) Stir in a few spoonfuls of vinegar or lemon juice; continue adding until mixture starts to gel. (3) Remove pan from heat and cool, then rinse the rubbery curds with water. The curds are plastic, formed by the chemical reaction between the casein in the milk and the acid in the vinegar or lemon juice.

Sourced and published by Henry Sapiecha 15th April 2010