EXADT_DT450G_PR#1112 micro dust particle measuring instrument image www.sciecearticlesonline.com
Yokogawa Corporation of America (Newnan, GA) announces the release of the model DT450G dust monitor. The DT450G detects the qualitative level of dust or particulate matter by working off of the principle of inductive electrification. This probe provides a highly sensitive measurement and is capable of detecting particles as small as 0.3 µm. Utilization of inductive electrification allows for detection of not only particles which make contact with the probe, but particles which pass by the probe as well. The signal generated by these particles is processed by advanced noise filtering algorithms resulting in a highly accurate dust measurement. Features include:

• A measurement range that can be set through a one-touch operation in response to process conditions.
• Automatic drift compensation.
• Air purging which prevents condensate from accumulating at connection points.
• Utility in applications with process temperatures up to 250°C (482°F) and pressures up to 200 kPa (29 psi).

For more information on the model DT450G, visit http://yokogawa.com/us.
Henry Sapiecha

Shark-detecting buoy
Researches at an Australian tech firm have recently come up with a potential solution called the Clever buoy, designed to emit sonar signals from a buoy anchored to the seabed by a box. The buoy uses a processor to analyze the returning sonar signals. The crazy part is that researchers have designed the technology so that it is capable of recognizing shark-shaped objects.

cleverbuoy shark detecting image www.sciencearticlesonline (3)

cleverbuoy shark detecting image www.sciencearticlesonline (2)

cleverbuoy shark detecting image www.sciencearticlesonline (1)

SHARK DETECTION SENSOR SYSTEM HAS BEEN DEVELOPED

Henry Sapiecha

WEARING A VERY SMALL FLEXIBLE MONITORING DEVICE REPLACES LARGE ONES

Zhenan Bao, a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford University, has developed a flexible, skin-like heart monitor that is sensitive enough to detect stiff arteries and cardiovascular problems. The sensor is worn under an adhesive bandage on the wrist. To make the monitor so small and sensitive, Bao’s team used a thin middle layer of rubber covered with tiny pyramid bumps. Each mold-made pyramid is only a few microns in diameter. When pressure is put on the device, the pyramids deform slightly, changing the size of the gap between the two halves of the device. This change in separation causes a measurable change in the electromagnetic field and the current flow in the device.

AAA

Henry Sapiecha

fine gold line

THE LAND DOWN UNDER PRODUCES SOME GREAT NEW INVENTIONS BY GREAT IMAGINATIVE MINDS

An Australian entrepreneur has developed a reimagined light bulb that can last for 25 years and be controlled by smartphone – and in two days he’s raised more than $600,000 on crowd-funding website Kickstarter to make it come to life.

Phil Bosua of Ferny Creek in Melbourne, 38, a father of two, is the creator of LIFX, a Wi-Fi enabled, multi-colour, energy efficient LED light-bulb that you can control with your iPhone or Android smartphone.

LIFX can not only be turned on and off using a smartphone, but can also have its colour and brightness changed. It can also be programmed to be turned on at certain times and can even be set to match the beat of a song, as well as react to notifications on a smartphone like those from Twitter and Facebook and flash a certain colour.

Phil Bosua.
Phil Bosua, inventor and co-founder of LIFX.

Speaking with Fairfax Media from New York, where Bosua is “learning how entrepreneurship works in America”, he said the idea to re-invent the light-bulb came to him about six months ago when a friend relayed a frustration to him concerning renovating.

“Basically a friend of mine was sort of saying that they wished that they could have a wireless [light-bulb] switch in their home because they were renovating and didn’t want to cut up their brick wall to run a wire down it,” Bosua said. “And he basically asked me [what I could do about it], because he sort of knew that I was the inventive type.

“I said, ‘Well, actually, I think there’s something in that. I think it would be possible to connect your smartphone to your lights. [And] it really just grew from that.”’

LIFX allows you match your lighting with your mood.
LIFX allows you to match your lighting with your mood.

He said LIFX light-bulbs can last up to 25 years and used up to 50 to 80 per cent less energy than light-bulbs currently used by many households and said this was one of the reasons why he wanted to get his project off the ground, as he thought that current light-bulbs “didn’t represent the smart culture of our day and our eco-aware sensibilities”.

But he never expected the project, which began as a weekend hobby, to reach more than $500,000 on its second day of crowd-funding, surpassing the $100,000 goal he set on it (just over $500,000 was pledged this morning and by this afternoon it had reached $600,000). The minimum pledge, which more than 900 backers have chosen, costs $US69 and gets the backers one LIFX light-bulb, which includes shipping to Australia, Canada or the US.

“Wow. That was my first reaction,” Bosua said when seeing how much had been pledged by the more than 3900 backers on the Kickstarter website as of this morning.

You can also visualise your music using LIFX.
You can also visualise your music using LIFX.

“I’m glad that this project resonated with people as much as it resonated with me,” he said.

As well as working on his project to re-invent the light-bulb, which now has six co-founders, Bosua runs a successful iPhone and iPad app-making business called LimeMouse and is also working on a project called RefreshHQ to make brand’s Facebook feeds more engaging. He’s also been involved in two other Kickstarter projects, one of which raised $184,499 earlier this year to build a portable scanning box that uses a smartphone’s camera to take high-quality scans.

He said one of the most successful apps he had developed through LimeMouse was a Gray’s Anatomy e-book designed for people like medical students or others interested in the human body.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

POINT-AIM-SHOOT-WE KNOW YOUR NAME BECAUSE OF YOUR SKIN TYPE ETC

Online shopping and advertising already do it, take information based on the pages or products that a person had looked at and provide advertisements, or links to other products that may also interest that person.

In just a few years shops could use facial recognition technology to do the same.

A Perth professor is working on research that he hopes could play a role in creating this technology.

Associate Professor Ajmal Mian from the University of Western Australia first became interested in facial recognition technology when doing his PHD which he completed in 2006.

Since then he has continued to research how to use satellite technology to identify facial features that lie under the skin.

It is believed that a dot-sized part of a face may soon be all that is needed to identify a person.

Professor Mian said by incorporating numerous images of a person from different angles into a system, these could possibly be used to later identify that person by just a small section of their face.

He said while facial recognition technology was not new, being able to identify someone from just a small part of their face meant recognition could be done faster and easier.

“To be more useful it has to not be intrusive, so you don’t need to come in contact with it like fingerprinting and the ultimate is to do it without people noticing it’s happening, without them having to stop and look at a camera,” Professor Mian said.

“I am trying to dig out more accurate techniques and find different algorithms to be able to identify people more easily.”

He said a shop may use the technology to maintain a customer database.

“We know security cameras are there but if shops say you need to get fingerprinted, people are not going to want to do that,” Professor Mian said.

He said the technology may not necessarily associate people by their names.

“They may group you by different charts, they don’t necessarily have to attach a name to it, each time you come in they see what you buy, if customer A buys item such-and-such they are most likely to buy item such-and-such, like on Amazon,” he said.

Mr Mian said it was up to marketing staff as to how the information was used.

He said multi-spectral imaging can be used to measure light reflected off a face at hundreds of discrete wavelengths in the visible spectrum and beyond.

This meant that the technology being worked on would be able to recognise a person despite their different facial expressions.

Professor Mian said his research may also be able to detect people who have used cosmetic surgery to alter their looks.

He said he did not expect the technology to be expensive once created.

“Once the algorithm is developed it won’t be expensive, it is the research which is the expensive part, all you will need is a few cameras.”

“It’ll start up in shops that spend a lot of money on customer care and marketing and others will follow.”

He admitted that there would be some concerns about privacy.

“There’s always a concern about security and privacy and there’s always a trade off, it will be a discussion of topic forever,” Professor Mian said.

He said the kind of facial recognition technology he envisioned could be used in security and if used at airports could greatly improve the identification process at the immigration sections of airports.

Professor Mian was also looking into the possibility of applying it to psychology and also identifying whether people had certain syndromes.

Associate Professor Mian is the only West Australian to have won the Australasian Distinguished Dissertation Award from The Computing Research and Education Association of Australasia.

He has also won two prestigious national fellowships: the Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship and the Australian Research Fellowship.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha


CICADA gliding UAV is designed to deploy sensors behind enemy lines
When soldiers want to gather intelligence in enemy territory, they often have to travel into high risk territory themselves, depositing acoustic, magnetic, chemical/biological or signals intelligence sensors by hand. Not only does this place the soldiers in harm’s way, but the logistics of such missions can also end up being quite costly. That’s why the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Vehicle Research Section created the CICADA unmanned air vehicle (UAV). The tiny sensor-equipped glider was successfully tested at Arizona’s Yuma Proving Grounds on September 1st.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

 

COMPUTER BIO LOGIC GATES FROM BACTERIA

DNA is often referred to as the building block of life. Now scientists from Imperial College London have demonstrated that DNA (and bacteria) can be used to create the fundamental building blocks of a computer – logic gates. Using DNA and harmless gut bacteria, the scientists have built what they claim are the most advanced biological logic gates ever created by scientists. The research could lead to the development of a new generation of microscopic biological computing devices that, amongst other things, could travel around the body cleaning arteries and destroying cancers.

While previous research had already proven biological logic gates could be made, the Imperial College scientists say the big advantage of their creations is that they behave like their electronic counterparts – replicating the way that electronic logic gates process information by either switching “on” or “off.” Importantly, the new biological logic gates are also modular, meaning they could be fitted together to make different types of logic gates and more complex biological processors.

To create a type of logic gate called an “AND gate,” the team used modified DNA to reprogram Escherichia Coli (E.Coli) bacteria to perform the same switching on and off process as its electronic equivalent when stimulated by chemicals. In a similar way to the way electronic components are made, the team demonstrated that the biological gates could be connected together to form more complex components.

The team also created a “NOT gate” and combined it with the AND gate to produce the more complex “NAND gate.” NAND gates are significant because any Boolean function (AND, OR, NOT, XOR, XNOR), which play a basic role in the design of computer chips, can be implemented by using a combination of NAND gates.

The researchers will now try and develop more complex circuitry that comprises multiple logic gates. To accomplish this they will need to find a way to link multiple biological logic gates together that is similar to the way in which electronic logic gates are linked together to enable complex processing to be carried out.

“We believe that the next stage of our research could lead to a totally new type of circuitry for processing information,” said Professor Martin Buck from the Department of Life Sciences at Imperial College London. “In the future, we may see complex biological circuitry processing information using chemicals, much in the same way that our body uses them to process and store information.”

The team also suggests that these biological logic gates could one day form the building blocks of microscopic biological devices, such as sensors that swim inside arteries, detecting the build up of harmful plaque and rapidly delivering medications to the affected area. Other sensors could detect and destroy cancer cells inside the body, while others could be deployed in the environment to monitor pollution and detect and neutralize dangerous toxins.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

Medical tech company creates

world’s smallest video camera

Medigus has developed the world’s smallest video camera at just 0.039-inches (0.99 mm) in diameter. The Israeli company’s second-gen model (a 1.2 mm / 0.047-inch diameter camera was unveiled in 2009) has a dedicated 0.66×0.66 mm CMOS sensor from TowerJazz that captures images at 45K resolution (approximately 220 x 220 pixels) and no, it’s not destined for use in tiny mobile phones or covert surveillance devices, instead the camera is designed for medical endoscopic procedures in hard to reach regions of the human anatomy.

The miniature cameras are made with bio-compatible compnents and are suitable for diagnostic and surgical procedures. Potential applications include cardiology, bronchoscopy, gastroenterology, gynecology, and orthopedic and robotic surgery.

“Medical procedures that have not been possible until now become possible with the world’s smallest camera,” said Dr. Elazar Sonnenschein, CEO for Medigus Ltd.

The camera will be integrated into Medigus’ own disposable endoscopic devices as well as sold to third-party manufacturers.

Medigus says it will begin supplying camera samples to US and Japanese manufacturers in coming weeks.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha


Cougar 20-H surveillance robot

that sees through walls

and detects breathing up to 300 foot

By Darren Quick

21:59 February 6, 2011


The Cougar20-H is a remote-controlled surveillance robot that is so sensitive it can not only detect motion through walls but, to ensure no one goes unnoticed, it can also detect the breathing of a stationary person. Packing a fine beam ultra-wideband (UWB), multi-Gigahertz radio frequency (RF) sensor array as well as multiple integrated cameras for day and night time visibility, the Cougar20-H was designed by surveillance imaging specialist TiaLinx to provide improved situational awareness to soldiers while keeping them out of harm’s way.

The lightweight and agile robot travels on caterpillar tracks and is remotely controlled via a laptop that can be located more than 300 feet (91 m) away. An RF scanner mounted on the robot’s lightweight arm transmits highly directional wideband signals that are able to penetrate reinforced concrete walls at an extended range. Reflections from the targets are captured by a signal detector circuit in the receiver and amplitude and delay information is then processed in an integrated signal processor to track the targets in real time.

“Cougar20-H has the capability to sense-through-the-wall (STTW) at farther distances than Cougar10-L that was launched last month,” said Dr. Fred Mohamadi, Founder and CEO of TiaLinx. “Cougar20-H can also be remotely programmed at multiple way points to scan the desired premise in a multi-story building and provide its layout. In contrast only Cougar10-L is capable of scanning a premise horizontally for unexploded ordnance (UXO) as well as vertically to STTW.”

TiaLinx developed the Cougar20-H’s real-time UWB RF Imaging technology with funding from the U.S. Army. In addition to military applications, the robot, which ships next month, could also allow law enforcement agencies to detect potential targets within buildings or allow firefighters to locate people inside burning buildings.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

Tech Talk Video about building guidance system

Thumbnail image for video asset.

Doughnut blimp guide

A Queensland avionics engineering student has created a floating doughnut shaped blimp to guide people through a building. Courtesy CSIRO.AUSTRALIA

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha